Shipping in Virginia

one of the first industries in the colony of Virginia was shipbuilding
one of the first industries in the colony of Virginia was shipbuilding
Source: National Park Service, Boat Building at Jamestown (painting by Sidney E. King)

Native Americans in Virginia made canoes that were stable enough for crossing the Chesapeake Bay to the Eastern Shore. Human muscle propelled the canoes. Virginia's first inhabitants did not develop the technology of building ships powered by wind, using sails.

The Spanish priests in 1570 and the English colonists in 1607 arrived by ship. The trees in Virginia that were the raw material for canoes became the raw material for building sailing ships. Shipyards were a common site along the coastline. In the 1900's, there were still shipyards at Alexandria and Quantico on the Potomac River. The shipbuilding industry continues today, most notably in the construction of aircraft carriers and submarines at Newport News.

Since 1607, Virginia has always been engaged in international trade using ships constructed in other places. Modern tankers and cntainer ships export products such as coal, soybeans, and tobacco. Imports of containerized cargo and bulk materials arrive at Hampton Roads ports, primarily.

Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel

Colonial Shipping and Town Development in Tidewater

Craney Island Dredged Material Management Area and Craney Island Marine Terminal (CIMT)

Cruise Ships in Virginia

Hampton Roads Transportation Planning

Marking and Dredging Navigation Channels in Virginia

Port Cities

Ports in Virginia

Potomac River Water Taxis - and Commuter Ferry?

Railroad Access and Hampton Roads Shipping Terminals

Hampton Roads Shipping Channels and Port Competition

Steamboats in Virginia

colonial waterfronts were industrial areas of a town, with wharves and warehouses
colonial waterfronts were industrial areas of a town, with wharves and warehouses
Source: National Park Service, Colonial Yorktown Waterfront (painting by Sidney E. King)

a pre-World War II postcard shows a ferry that ran between the Eastern Shore and Princess Anne County (now the City of Virginia Beach) until the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel opened in 1964
a pre-World War II postcard shows a ferry that ran between the Eastern Shore and Princess Anne County (now the City of Virginia Beach) until the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel opened in 1964
Source: Boston Public Library, S. S. Pocahontas, automobile and passenger transport between Kiptoeke Beach and (Little Creek) Va., Norfolk, Virginia

Links


From Feet to Space: Transportation in Virginia
Virginia Places