Native American Pottery

the Pamunkey in the 1900's made pottery in the traditional Woodland style
the Pamunkey in the 1900's made pottery in the traditional Woodland style
Source: Smithsonian Institution, Jar made in Late Woodland archaeological style

Marcey Creek ceramics, the first pottery, was made with crushed soapstone (white flakes) to prevent pots from cracking when fired
Marcey Creek ceramics, the first pottery, was made with crushed soapstone (white flakes) to prevent pots from cracking when fired
Source: Virginia Humanities, Virginia Indian Archive, Marcey Creek Ceramic Sherds

Native Americans decorated their pottery in various ways, including stamping the wet clay before firing a pot
Native Americans decorated their pottery in various ways, including stamping the wet clay before firing a pot
Source: Virginia Humanities, Virginia Indian Archive, Stamped Ceramic Sherds

fabric was wrapped around some wet clay pots to decorate them, before firing
fabric was wrapped around some wet clay pots to decorate them, before firing
Source: Virginia Humanities, Virginia Indian Archive, Fabric Marked Ceramic Vessel

pottery replaced carved soapstone for containers, but stone and bone tools were still essential for other purposes
pottery replaced carved soapstone for containers, but stone and bone tools were still essential for other purposes
Source: Virginia Humanities, Virginia Indian Archive, Grooved Stone Axe


Native Americans - The First Geologists in Virginia
"Indians" of Virginia - the Real First Families of Virginia
Virginia Places