Snow in Virginia

in Virginia, counties closer to the Atlantic Ocean get less snow each year
in Virginia, counties closer to the Atlantic Ocean get less snow each year
Source: Library of Congress, "The national atlas of the United States of America," Snowfall

Virginia Beach gets snow, but not often enough to invest in snow-removal equipment that could clear it away quickly. The city estimates it would need to purchase 300 more trucks to plow snow from every neighborhood. Plowing is feasible only when snow reaches a depth of two inches, and Virginia Beach anticipates that a fleet of snowplows would sit idle for years between storms that required plowing the streets.

When the city did get a 13-inch snowfall in March 1980, the governor mobilized the National Guard. It cleared neighborhood roads, but in the process the equipment broke side mirrs off parked cars, cracked windshields, and created piles of snow that blocked driveways. Rather than repeat that experience, the city has a snow removal plan based on using its own equipment to plow primarily the major highways.1

counties closer to the Atlantic Ocean get fewer days of snow each year, as well as fewer inches
counties closer to the Atlantic Ocean get fewer days of snow each year, as well as fewer inches
Source: Library of Congress, "The national atlas of the United States of America," Snowfall

Links

References

1. "Issue: Why Doesn’t the City Buy Enough Equipment to Plow Every Neighborhood During a Snowstorm?," City of Virginia Beach, https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/communications-office/fact-or-fiction/Pages/Snow-Plows.aspx (last checked March 2, 2019)

Virginia Beach's snow removal plan focuses on plowing major routes, not neighborhood roads
Virginia Beach's snow removal plan focuses on plowing major routes, not neighborhood roads
Source: City of Virginia Beach, Citywide Priority 1 Plowing Routes


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